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Fan’s spot: Thilo Remus (Germany)

The KTM Blog takes a look at some passionate motorcyclists wherever we can find them. Some people are still die-hard racers, others like to travel and tour, some can’t get enough of track days and windy roads and then there are those that just like to slowly fill their garage. Today we meet Thilo Remus from Stuttgart in Germany.


Tell us about you…
I’m 52. I’m an automotive engineer and have been working at Daimler AG in Stuttgart for 26 years. My bike is a 2007 KTM 950 Supermoto R that has now racked-up 15,000km.

Why this bike?
I always rode single-cylinder enduros on the street because I was also motorcycle racing on tracks at the same time. I had a KTM LC4, a very good motorcycle but when the Supermoto R came out the concept as well as the design totally convinced me, so I bought it and I am still in love with it today.

What do you like and dislike about your bike?
I like the torque and the performance of the V2, the sound and it’s vivid temperament. The chassis with its stability and the forks as well as the rear suspension is pretty genius. I made the setup softer, also worked on carburetion and made the gear ratios longer. The bike reminds me of superbiking; a Suzuki GS 1000 with wide handlebars, you know, that kind of style. It´s a bit similar to it and I like it a lot.

Can you imagine a life without a motorcycle?
Not at all. Motorbikes have always fascinated me, also working on and fine-tuning them. I road raced for more than 20 years. I competed also in the national 500 four-stroke class way back in 1985, where Helmut Bradl, the father of MotoGP rider Stefan Bradl, started his career. I did everything myself; from the tank and rear-frame in aluminium, the whole exhaust system was self-fabricated, along with engine-tuning, GFK work and stuff. That is the engineer inside me, it’s fun to build or modify something and then using it in competition.

Your dealer says: “It’s time for something new…” what’s your reaction?
Maybe I will take a test-ride. The new 1190 Adventure was tempting for sure but I am not really a touring guy. Maybe I am on my way to becoming a off-road guy! I also ride mountain bikes. Just recently I participated at the German Bikemasters, which is a team-effort, like a marathon and sprint competition on the Nürburgring-track for bicycle riders. So maybe the mix will get me into off-roading because now I plan to try it in an organized tour in the Gobi desert.

Imagine you meet a highly ranked KTM manager, what do you tell him?
KTM´s development is pretty remarkable. I find their model range today very attractive. I could easily pick three bikes. I am also a big fan of the single-cylinder Duke, but the older one, not the present one, which I do not like. I would like to have a go on the RC8 R. In the past I rode Japanese singles because I found KTM’s to be very expensive but since I bought a LC4 in 2000, I now think differently. When I sold it six-and-a half-years later, I got just 400 Euros less than what I had paid. Usually you can only dream about this. So the value of the bike stays high for a long period of time. You don’t get this with other motorcycles.